The Faded Pink Sand of Sta. Cruz Island

At 6:30am, we found ourselves back at the Paseo del Mar for the berthing point to Sta. Cruz island or locally known as Las Islas de Sta. Cruz. This island claimed to have pink sand. We registered and paid P25 per person which includes the entrance and terminal fees. The boat rental was P1000.

There is a limit to the number of visitors to the island. Visitors will be entertained on first come, first serve basis. Besides, it is an environmentally protected island. In every group which will go to the island will be accompanied by a tourism police. It is for the security purpose. There was a history of bandit attack on the island. Thus, overnight staying is not allowed.

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We left the berthing point at 7:20am and we arrived at the island after 15 minutes. The traditional vinta colored sail greeted our eyes from the shore. The “vinta” boat is the trademark of Zamboanga. The beach was not pinkish as seen on blogs and websites but there was a little pink particle found on the white sand. We rented a small open cottage and ordered our food. There were locals selling crabs, shells, and fishes. They will also cook and deliver it to the cottage at a very cheap amount.

The place is so quite and peaceful. We asked the island’s tourism staff, who also work for the government, for the special heritage place in the island. He guided us to the preserved Badjao majority tribe cemetery. There were also other tribes laid peacefully on that place. The Badjao, known in the history books as the dwellers of the sea, is one among tribes of Filipino Muslims in Mindanao. He explained the tribal ways and beliefs of burying dead. He also explained that the pink color of the island is also seasonal. There is a special specie of corals which naturally contributed to the pinkish color of the sand and their reproduction take times. However, we saw that the waves left the shore with the pink sand.

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The island is protected by the government. The Department of Environment and Natural Resources is leading on funding its preservation. A group of environmentalists and nature lovers were sighted on their scuba suits monitoring the newly planted corals.

We enjoyed the serenity and the water on the beach. However, extra precaution was needed for kids and non-swimmers because of the sudden depth of the seabed. We left the island at 11:30am to give way to other tourist who wishes to visit the island. Bringing back of all the garbage that we brought was our contribution to preserve the island and its environment.

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Environmentalist planting corals

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